Home History Q&A Harrison’s history told in mural on Harrison Hill
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Harrison’s history told in mural on Harrison Hill

Published on May 18, 2012 by in History Q&A
Question: Boone County Historical and Railroad Society board member Richard Dix requested that a column be about “the best kept secret in Boone County.”
Answer: Richard Dix, a history buff, suggested everyone should know about the great mural, painted on the huge wall at the Family Budget Inn. The Inn is located near the top of Harrison Hill at 401 South Main. The art work of Trena Terry is a visual history of Boone County – although not visible from the street, it is well worth a drive down into the motel area – where history comes alive in her talented artwork.
Let’s discuss only four sections of the mural – each section’s story is written on a plaque and we quote that script:
Crooked Creek Church of 1834. Crooked Creek Church of 1834.
(1) Crooked Creek Church of 1834 – It was on July 3, 1834 that the Crooked Creek Church was established in the valley that was later to become Harrison, Arkansas. From their beginnings, as stated in their constitution, they declared, “We believe in only one true and living God, the Father, the Word and the Holy Ghost.”
Connerley Hotel Ca: 1900. Connerley Hotel Ca: 1900.
(2) Connerley Hotel Ca: 1900 – W. M. Connerley opened a boarding house on Crooked Creek in Harrison, Arkansas in 1896. Travelers could buy a meal for 15 cents, a bed for 15 cents a night, and horse stalls were 10 cents. The Connerley’s operated the hotel until it burned in 1924.
St. Louis & North Arkansas Locomotive Engine No. 3. St. Louis & North Arkansas Locomotive Engine No. 3.
(3) St. Louis & North Arkansas Locomotive Engine No. 3, March 22, 1901 – On March 22, 1901, Engine No. 3 rolled into Harrison. By 1903, the tracks extended to Leslie and the trains were busy hauling strawberries, apples and timber products. After changing hands several times, after World War I, it finally ceased operation after flooding in 1960.
Cave Mountain During the Civil War. Cave Mountain During the Civil War.
(4) Cave Mountain During the Civil War – Cave Mountain was one of the largest sources of saltpeter in this part of the country. On January 12, 1863, Union Commander Joseph W. Caldwell marched the First Iowa Cavalry into the Ozarks and destroyed the saltpeter works at Cave Mountain. Cave Mountain ceased to be a resource for the uncivil war against brothers.
Just as the Boone County Historical and Railroad Society strives to preserve the history of this county, this talented lady has also done her part using artistic ability. We encourage you to take time to see this mural and to also visit the Boone County Heritage Museum, housed in the historical 1912 Harrison High School building. Located on the corner of South Cherry Street and Central Avenue, the museum is now observing winter hours and is open only on Thursday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Beginning March 1 the museum will be open five days per week.
This column appears Fridays in the Harrison Daily Times. Mail questions to Boone County Heritage Museum, P. O. Box 1094, Harrison, AR 72601. Marilyn Smith can be contacted at bchm@windstream.net
 
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3 Comments  comments 

3 Responses

  1. William B. Connerley

    I have a picture of the Connerley Hotel in my family pictures along with other pictures of the Connerley and Milum family. William Martin Connerley moved from Parke County Indiana to Harrison, AR and opened the Connerley Hotel.

    • admin

      We would love to have a copy of the picture for our collection, William!

      • William B. Connerley

        Sorry I have not replied to you quicker. Please provide me an email address and I will send a scanned copy of the pictures I have of the Connerley Hotel.

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